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20131202
20131210
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CSPAN2 6
MSNBCW 4
KQEH (PBS) 2
CSPAN 1
KGO (ABC) 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
LINKTV 1
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English 16
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2013 7:00am EST
at the end. asked what he i persuaded congrs to pass the four major legislatures involving civil rights. so on that count, which it achieved what johnson and chief? >> i don't think he ever would've had the kind of come the great society indeed and commitment that johnson had. because kennedy was essentially a foreign policy president. he used to say politics can ncj, but foreign policy can kill you. he would have gotten i think it would've run against barry goldwater, he would have won a big victory the way johnson it. he would have carried big majorities, democratic majorities into the house and senate i think. and i think he would've gotten the big tax cut, the federal aid to education, the medicare and the civil rights bills past. that would put them in the lead. the most, the rest of the 20th century presidential reformers, alongside of tr and wilson and even compared somewhat to fdr. i don't think he would have pushed beyond that. i think he would've pushed toward detente. i think we would have seen they don't earlier with kennedy family did with richard nixon, because that cuban miss
LINKTV
Dec 6, 2013 2:00pm PST
. in the 1960s during the civil rights and anti-war movements, music became a driving force in the struggle for social change. (seeger) there wasn't a single meeting that didn't have singing. "we shall overcome" was the most famous song, but there were hundreds of others. they'd change over a gospel song, put new words to it. very common technique. it's been done for centuries. "we shall overcome" was originally a fast song. [clapping] ♪ i'll overcome. ♪ i'll overcome someday. ♪ we shall overcome. when you sing "we shall overcome," your shoulders are touching because you're crossing your arms in front of you, and swaying across from right to left. [softly] ♪ we shall overcome. well, a month after the founding of sncc, this song was sung throughout the whole south. it was the song; it wasn't a song; it was the song. in it's own quiet way, it was taking confidence. you can kill me, you can beat me, but i know we shall overcome. (scott-mclaughlin) in the prisons, they would sing songs. when they we're being beaten by the dogs, they would sing songs. and you'd have to ask yourself what
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2013 7:00pm EST
on in vietnam, and it covered the civil rights development and the development in the american south, and some others have been in africa as well. and we all had military training and so as the conflict began, we had journalists who know a lot about the world and the military and had taken a very healthy, you know, view of the role of the journalists that has been challenging to government or challenging to authorities that fits under the traditional role as challenging authority to see what is really going on. and it was then and that environment in which the pictures and the news started coming out in vietnam and we discovered this, that the vietnamese that we met were very candid about what they were facing and many of them were our age were very candid about this as well about what they felt and what they saw and therefore we felt that we were getting a clear picture of what was emerging as the conflict grew in size. our vision differed markedly from the kennedy administration was hoping for and definitely from the johnson administration as well, president kennedy late in 1972 found the ed
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2013 6:30pm EST
the respect he had for judge pryor, i knew mr. pickering who had really been a pioneer for civil rights in the state of mississippi in the 1960's and 1970's when it was hard to be. the truth was the majority of democrats said, we're going t to -- we're going to block 10 of the bush judges. never been done before, but we're going to do it with a cloture vote. well, madam president, as you can guess, everyone on the republican side in the majority then got very excited. and the majority leader, senator frist, said, we're going to change the rules, do something that senator lott, a majority leader once said, was the nuclear option. and there was great consternation. senator reid said -- he recounts this very well in his book -- in 2006, he said, to do so would be the end of the senate. i made two speeches, madam president. i suggested, well, this is a terrible thing to do. a president ought to have an up-or-down vote on his circuit judges. so why don't we see if we can't get a few republicans and a few democrats and just take it out of the hands of the leaders and agree that we'll only use
Al Jazeera America
Dec 8, 2013 8:00pm EST
inspiration from him during the civil rights days here in america, and they prayed for him and gave him their support all those years when he was in prison. and, of course, it was a big event here when only a few months after he got out of prison, he came to visit this church. it does beg the question how you memorialize this man in just one sermon. we spoke earlier to senior pastor j. edgar boyd? >> i he dismantled with the prison cell with the help of those here in america and other parts of the world, the giant, the you know grateful and the wronged giant of apartheid. he disassembled it and brought about hope, and it brought about liberation not only for himself but for peace-loving people throughout south africa. >> new mexico new mexico had been out of the public eye for many years before he died but there are parishioners here who met him and we spoke to one of them? >> what a blissing it meet in gentleman, more than anything in life, the one who told us to forgive. the hardest thing to do in life is to forgive. he told us to forgive. no forgive and move on. yes, et cetera my her
ABC
Dec 9, 2013 3:00am PST
of nelson mandela. >> the civil rights icon has 17 grandchildren, some of whom opened up in a rare interview with abc's rina ninan. >> reporter: set free after 27 years in prison. >> first steps into a new south africa. >> reporter: some of his grandchildren found themselves longing for his prison days. >> those days i cherished because it was just the two of no one else. when he came out we did not have him because he had bigger issues to tackle. >> reporter: his grandson remembers visiting him when he was 4. >> he asked the wardens if he could put cartoons on the tv so me and my other cousins could sit and watch them and he offered us hot chocolate and he made it himself. >> reporter: his granddaughter said that while he couldn't physically touch them, his words always did. >> at the end of the visit he brought me a box of chocolates saying your visit will always be a bittersweet memory for me. >> reporter: words in the form of letters written to the family from jail. this one describing the moment that he was told his son was killed in a car accident. >> it describes his heart seems to st
MSNBC
Dec 2, 2013 5:00pm PST
to create the santa clausification of rosa parks and martin luther king jr. and other civil rights leaders. they are cast as figures with no history or context, just celebrated as the good guys who fought the forces of evil. consider the 2005 eulogy for parks from bill frist, flagged today. frisk said it was "not an intentional attempt to change a nation but a singular act aimed at restoring the dignity of the individual." and that gets it exactly wrong. rosa parks was an actual human being who was embedded in a whole bunch of institutions and organizations that were very much trying to change the nation. she was part of not just the liberal left, but the radical left. she trained at the highlander folk school in tennessitennesse legendary leftist training guard regarded as a communist training school by southern segregationist. she was secretary of the montgomery naacp when arrested, an organization with deep roots in the city's trade union movement, which it helped organize her protest. she years earlier helped organize a campaign for young african-americans to borrow books from whites-o
PBS
Dec 6, 2013 11:00pm PST
but reunite once more as 50 red, white, and blue states. as the civil rights leader once reminded us -- "we may have arrived on these shores in different ships, but we are all in the same boat now." so, my friends, the time has come for the sons and daughters of lincoln and the heirs of jefferson and jackson to no longer wage war upon each other but to instead renew the struggle against the ancient enemies of man -- ignorance, poverty and disease. that is why we are here. that is why. >> he was so disgusted with washington. and, of course, he stayed. and there are all these examples of what he has gone on to do. so, look, it all speaks for itself. i mean, you can -- it's nice that there are commentators who can put a fine a point -- or a finer point on it. but this is all out there. >> chris dodd, former peace corps volunteer. >> chris dodd, very nice guy, very fun-loving guy. i mean, very sort of, you know, outspoken liberal. he was -- he had this great legislative last hurrah in 2010, where he -- you know, he coauthored dodd-frank. he was one of the chief engineers of the health care bill
NBC
Dec 6, 2013 7:00am PST
life. >> reporter: president obama paid homage to a civil rights icon. >> let us pause and give thanks for the fact that nelson mandela lived. a man who took history in his hands and bent the mark of the moral universe toward justice. >> reporter: queen elizabeth remembered his efforts. his legacy is the peaceful south africa we see today, she said. a glittering film premiere in london attended by the royal couple and two of mandela's daughters celebrated the movie of his life, "long walk to freedom." his death was announced as the credits rolled. >> extremely tragic news. we are just reminded what an extraordinary man he was. >> reporter: mandela will have a state funeral but it was his leading by example that helped so many. >> we lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings any of us will share time with here on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> reporter: this country is now in an official state of mourning. his body will lie in state for viewing and a funeral is expected. matt, back to you. >> richard, thanks so muc
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 1:30pm EST
as lawyer, i've had to persuade civil rights groups to take particular positions when, for example, in new york city once an organization wanted to stop george lincoln rockwell, a terrible racist, from speaking in a park there, and i had a very difficult time persuading them that that's probably the -- trying to keep him from being licensed to speak is probably the best way to give him a big audience. why not just ignore him? and the same thing with books. you know, sometimes i know authors can't get any better advertisement than somebody trying to keep their books off the shelves. but when it does happen -- and it does happen frequently -- we're really talking about one of the most dangerous robs in our culture -- problems in our culture, and it is the stifling of ideas and taken to the extreme in nazi germany when they burn books, we see where that goes. so my excerpt isn't as delightful as the last one. it concerns the problems of war, and it comes from a book almost 100 years old about war, "all quiet on the western front." before going over to see -- [inaudible] we pack up his things.
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2013 10:30am EST
up icing, i'm reminded of something the civil rights leader said when he said, we may have arrived on these shores in different ships, but we're all in the same boat now. what's going on in this town is that too often, the two political parties, you would think they were from different countries. they view the other side as the enemy, not as foul citizens. we have interests in common. we've got to reconcile our differences, not accentuate them. we forget we come from a common country with a common heritage, and for sure a common destiny. final thing i would say, and this is something that no labels is working to overcome, in this city today what all of you have to do every session in your state legislatures, forge principle compromised. the word cover my switchback in the day my father son used to be viewed as that's an act of statesmanship. today it is used as an act of betrayal. if you don't vote with your party, joe manchin was saying, 100% of the time, you are ostracized. there's something wrong with you. you can see this on cable tv. so i'll just finish by recounting some word
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2013 7:45am EST
itself has caused harms, particularly in civil rights-type cases. but where there is a private party that is alleged to have forgot the government, -- alleged to have ripped off the government, that is the false claims act. host: a few issues that the false claims act. i -- that the false claims act prohibits. host: that according to the justice department. we are talking to colette matzzie about the false claims act, some of its history, and some of its applications today. matthew is up next on our line for democrats. thanks for calling "washington journal." caller: i would like to ask about the whistleblower law. can it be used for the tarp and banks that are too big to fail and can it be used for iraq, afghanistan, and syria, the eu building that we did, and the $12 trillion deficit caused? guest: well, in that context, taking the war context first, there is -- you know, there have been more cases, there will continue to be more cases. it is likely there are cases under investigation. ae typical were case involves private defense contractor who has submitted a claim to the united
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2013 7:00pm EST
-- >> and credit. >> right. >> looking at some of the figures who were known to people as established players, when the revolution finished as well as when the civil war was completed, george washington, for example, 1775, seemed to be somewhat of an out lie -- out-ly 'er. >> when i came up with the book, my concern was, washington, the walking marble man, and what us he going to really be a buzz kill once he arrives on the scene after the battle of bunker hill. anything but. i mean, it's just fascinating to see washington. a man from virginia, arriving in new england. a couple weeks after the battle of bunker hill -- and this is a new england army. these are people whose idea of diversity is, okay, i'm from massachusetts but i'm willing to serve in an army with someone from new hampshire. and then to have this plantation owner arrive, and he realizes, this is an army that, because they have grown up with the new england town meeting -- which is a wonderful form of government in which basically people argue until finally they come to a decision. the soldiers in this army, when given an order, would
MSNBC
Dec 5, 2013 3:00am PST
or throat, or difficulty breathing or swallowing, stop taking cialis and get medical help right away. ask your doctor about cialis for daily use and a 30-tablet free trial. >> health care manufacturer johnson & johnson will pay to sell civil allegations. >> i expect this from you, johnson, but not you, johnson. to be honest, i have not trusted johnson & johnson since i tried to stop my child's crying with the no more tears shampoo in his eyes. did not work. >> the 113th hasn't passed the bills every congress does like a highway bill or defense bill or farm bill or a budget. what do we need a budget for? clearly not for highways, defense, or food. congress did pass a bill ensuring that people can fish near dams on the cumberland river and also passed deep cuts in food stamps if are the poor which is good solid governing because the poor don't need food stamps anymore now that they can fish near dams on the coupler withland river. >> time to talk about what we learned. we learned a lot. i learned you can catch a munch kin in your mouth if it is delivered right. >> it's not good. really bad
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)